Bad breath can be embarrassing and people with chronic or recurring bad breath often lose their self-confidence.

Certain foods, smoking, health conditions and habits are among the causes of bad breath.

How to get rid of bad breath:

 

  • Drink More Water

 

In order for your body to produce enough bacteria-fighting saliva, you must be drinking plenty of clean, fluoride-free water throughout the day. Since saliva is full of oxygen, bacteria have a much harder time surviving because they require low-oxygen environments in order to thrive. Saliva also contains natural enzymes that help stimulate the production of antibodies that neutralize bacteria, which end up getting eliminated when you swish with water, mouthwash, or other oral hygiene products.
Dehydration is one of the most common causes of bad breath. Many people drink far too little water throughout the day to ward off the bacteria in the mouth that are most responsible for causing bad breath. 

 

 

  • Use Herbs Daily

 

One way you can do this is by taking stinging nettle or drinking stinging nettle tea. A powerful herb that has been shown to purify the blood and eliminate toxins from the body, stinging nettle helps stimulate the lymphatic system, increase the excretion of uric acid through the kidneys, and boost adrenal function, all of which target halitosis at its root.
Since bad breath can also stem from a build-up of heavy metals, yeast overgrowth, and other toxins inside the body, it is important to regularly flush your system via dietary interventions

 

 

  • Salt Water Gargle

 

You might also find a salt water gargle to be useful as this combination helps eliminate bacteria from your throat and tonsils. Himalayan Crystal salt is recommended.

 






 

  • Include More Raw Foods In Your Diet.

 

Eat more carrots, celery, and apples. Crunchy fruits and vegetables, preferably organic, that are rich in fiber are also beneficial in the fight against bad breath. It can help scrape out the plaque buildups that are responsible for causing more mild or infrequent forms of bad breath, as well as add an extra dose of immune-boosting nutrients to your diet. These foods also help trigger an increased production of bacteria-fighting saliva inside the mouth.

 

 

  • Examine Your Hygiene Habits

 

Regularly brushing your teeth and tongue, especially after meals, as well as flossing daily, swishing with hydrogen peroxide and baking soda, and getting periodic teeth cleanings are, of course, the first places to start when addressing bad breath issues. But if the problem persists beyond all this, you may have some kind of nutritional deficiency or underlying health condition that requires other interventions as well. 


Note: If you choose to use a mouthwash or mouth spray as a temporary solution to the problem, it is particularly important that you choose one that has no alcohol at all. (Alcohol actually contributes to the development of bad breath and studies have shown that mouthwashes containing more than 25% alcohol are linked to an increased risk of developing oral cancer.)